Human-Livestock Entanglements into the Anthropocene

I was delighted to be invited to participate in Foodscapes: A World Food Day Symposium at the University of Canberra on October 16th. Every single one of the presentations sounds fascinating and this is what I’ll be talking about: Human-Livestock Entanglements into the Anthropocene If we are to believe popular media accounts of livestock agriculture, […]

Sheep Time?

I’m always trying to figure out new ways of doing remote presentations so I was pretty excited when I was invited to prepare something that could be continually broadcast (or looped) during the Temporal Design: Surfacing Everyday Tactics of Time Workshop @ Design Informatics, Edinburgh University, 28 September, 2015. Here’s what I did:   [ […]

Design Ethnography in the Anthropocene

It’s the second week of winter trimester, and I’m teaching my second-year undergraduate course in Design Ethnography. The theme this year is the Anthropocene, or how design relates to people’s relationships with animals, plants, the Earth’s elements, and “natural” materials in an era defined by humanity’s impact on the planet. In this course, students learn […]

New Zealand forest birds

Posted on Jul 5, 2015 in Animals & Plants & Stuff

“New Zealand’s forests were once filled with birds and their clamour: melodious songs, squawks, whirrs, squeaks, buzzing and chattering. These are the sounds of birds finding food, defending territory, attracting mates or guarding chicks.” – Christina Troup For the past couple of weeks, a black fantail has been flitting around the sheep. Black fantails are […]

Exporting livestock

Posted on Jun 22, 2015 in Animals & Plants & Stuff, Everyday Life

I recently wrote an Op Ed piece on government and industry failure to adequately communicate with New Zealanders about live export. It was published in the Dominion Post, and I think the comments may be more interesting than the piece I wrote. I also got a few positive comments via Twitter:   Public engagement is […]

Pope Francis’ encyclical on the environment, Laudato Si

Posted on Jun 18, 2015 in Animals & Plants & Stuff, Everyday Life

Pope Francis’ encyclical, released today, has been the most anticipated papal encyclical in decades. I’ll return to it soon, but for now I’ve copied an excerpt below. It really is an exceptional position on capitalism and the environment. “The Earth, our home, is beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth. […]

Pt I, Companion animals (and belonging)

Posted on Jun 18, 2015 in Animals & Plants & Stuff

I’ve started pulling together my paper for the Losing Ground – Gaining Ground session at the RGS Conference in Exeter in September, where I’ll be presenting on what it means to belong in the valley in which I live. Part of this involves sorting [Edit: casual (iPhone)] photos I’ve taken of the plants, animals and […]

Call for PhD Candidates

We’re looking for PhD candidates to join our Lab! The More-Than-Human Lab believes that everything is interconnected and interdependent, and we do research that is unusually lively and creaturely. Are you interested in increasingly blurred boundaries between nature and culture? Are you concerned about the future of the planet or technology for technology’s sake? Have […]

Introducing the More-Than-Human Lab

Posted on Mar 1, 2015 in Ordinary Madness of Academia

After five years of research and teaching, the Design Culture Lab has been retired and I’m excited to announce my new adventure: the More-Than-Human Lab. I’ve imported all of the old blog posts so that the archive lives here, and I’m working on getting all of our project documentation online. For now, you can read […]

Three Uncertain Thoughts, Or, Everything I Know I Learned from Ursula Le Guin

This text was prepared as an invocation for an upcoming RMIT Design + Ethnography + Futures workshop on “uncertainty as an intrinsic part of future-making.” (Links added.) One. In her 1969 novel The Left Hand of Darkness, Ursula K Le Guin writes, “The unknown, […] the unforetold, the unproven, that is what life is based […]